THE BLUE FAIRY BOOK

Andrew Lang’s Fairy Books or Andrew Lang’s “Coloured” Fairy Books constitute a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally (with the notable exception of Madame d’Aulnoy), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories.
The Blue Fairy Book assembled a wide range of tales, with seven from the Brothers Grimm, five from Madame d’Aulnoy, three from the Arabian Nights, and four Norse stories, among other sources.

Andrew Lang’s Fairy Books or Andrew Lang’s “Coloured” Fairy Books constitute a twelve-book series of fairy tale collections. Although Andrew Lang did not collect the stories himself from the oral tradition, the extent of his sources, who had collected them originally (with the notable exception of Madame d’Aulnoy), made them an immensely influential collection, especially as he used foreign-language sources, giving many of these tales their first appearance in English. As acknowledged in the prefaces, although Lang himself made most of the selections, his wife and other translators did a large portion of the translating and telling of the actual stories.
The Blue Fairy Book assembled a wide range of tales, with seven from the Brothers Grimm, five from Madame d’Aulnoy, three from the Arabian Nights, and four Norse stories, among other sources.

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3 Responses to THE BLUE FAIRY BOOK

  1. V. G. Harwood says:

    Fairy tales for both young and old I bought this book for my then eight year old daughter two years ago. She reads very quickly and literally seems to eat books. This book and others in the series seemed to draw her back again and again until our copy was quite dog-eared. I recently, rather absent-mindedly, decided to pick it up and have a look at some of the stories for myself. I found myself glued to the sofa for several days, having to move straight onto ‘The Grey Fairy Book’. These are as addictive as any modern day media…

  2. Inkhorn says:

    Classic edition of Classic Tales I did a folklore course during my first year at University and my tutor was constantly going on about the Andrew Lang collection of fairy tales – amazingly, it’s now 14 years since graduation and I’ve actually got round to picking one of these up and reading it (okay, not a great admission as testimony to my studiousness, but never mind, I got there in the end!) Now, however, that I have read the Blue Fairy Book, I will be reading the others too. This is a fantastic collection with such…

  3. Anonymous says:

    Not all editions are created equal If you are new to Lang, it started in 1889 with the blue fairy book, and then a series developed, yellow, crimson, orange, red, and so forth.The fact that this series has endured to now is a testament to its quality.As you read, you will discover fairy tales and myths from all over the world, including the well known writers such as Grimm, Andersen, Perrault, and Mme D’Aulnoy.These are not the politically correct stories you might expect, and I believe you…